bone-lust:

Vitale de Assisi) (1295 – May 31, 1370), was an Italian hermit and monk. Born in Bastia Umbra, Vitalis as a youth was licentious and immoral. However, he attempted to expiate his sins by going on pilgrimage to various sanctuaries in Italy and Europe. When he returned to Umbria, he became a Benedictine monk at Subiaco.

Vitalis then spent the rest of his life in the hermitage of Santa Maria di Viole, near Assisi, in utter poverty. His one possession was an old container that he used to drink water from a nearby spring. His reputation for holiness soon spread after his death. He was known as a patron against sicknesses and diseases affecting the bladder and genitals.

On 29 May 2011, a head preserved as a relic, allegedly that of this saint, was offered at auction with an estimate of €1,000 at Annesbrook House, Duleek, County Meath, Ireland. It was sold to an unnamed movie star from Los Angeles, California, for €3,500. More - http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-13522546

bone-lust:

Vitale de Assisi) (1295 – May 31, 1370), was an Italian hermit and monk. Born in Bastia Umbra, Vitalis as a youth was licentious and immoral. However, he attempted to expiate his sins by going on pilgrimage to various sanctuaries in Italy and Europe. When he returned to Umbria, he became a Benedictine monk at Subiaco.

Vitalis then spent the rest of his life in the hermitage of Santa Maria di Viole, near Assisi, in utter poverty. His one possession was an old container that he used to drink water from a nearby spring. His reputation for holiness soon spread after his death. He was known as a patron against sicknesses and diseases affecting the bladder and genitals.

On 29 May 2011, a head preserved as a relic, allegedly that of this saint, was offered at auction with an estimate of €1,000 at Annesbrook House, Duleek, County Meath, Ireland. It was sold to an unnamed movie star from Los Angeles, California, for €3,500. More - http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-13522546

Cite Arrow reblogged from bone-lust
magicscreeches:

Blessed Saint George pray for us!
Getting so much tingly St. George love from magicscreeches’s veneration. <3
egory [george] you our bravemonk macarius!you saved our cattlein the field and in the field,in the forest and the forest,under a light month,under the red sun,from ravenous wolves,from dire bear,from the evil beast.
Так благословить нас Святий Георгій!

magicscreeches:

Blessed Saint George pray for us!

Getting so much tingly St. George love from magicscreeches’s veneration. <3

egory [george] you our brave
monk macarius!
you saved our cattle
in the field and in the field,
in the forest and the forest,
under a light month,
under the red sun,
from ravenous wolves,
from dire bear,
from the evil beast.

Так благословить нас Святий Георгій!

Cite Arrow reblogged from magicscreeches
mini-girlz:

GREEK TERRACOTTA PROTOME BUST OF A GODDESSProbably Persephone, wearing peplos and himation; jewelry, garment folds and blond hair in red and yellow paint still visible.Ca. 470-450 BCH. 10 1/4 in. (26.2 cm.)
via &gt; royalathena.com

mini-girlz:

GREEK TERRACOTTA PROTOME BUST OF A GODDESS

Probably Persephone, wearing peplos and himation; jewelry, garment folds and blond hair in red and yellow paint still visible.

Ca. 470-450 BC

H. 10 1/4 in. (26.2 cm.)

via > royalathena.com

Cite Arrow reblogged from mini-girlz
hellenismo:

Painted terracotta figures of Bacchus and Ariadne, 50 BC - 50 CE, Thappsus, Sicily; now in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford…

hellenismo:

Painted terracotta figures of Bacchus and Ariadne, 50 BC - 50 CE, Thappsus, Sicily; now in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford…

Cite Arrow reblogged from mini-girlz
awwww-cute:

Tatiana, a resident in the village of Szack, Ukraine, and her horse

awwww-cute:

Tatiana, a resident in the village of Szack, Ukraine, and her horse

Cite Arrow reblogged from syxx

It has been said that there are passageways and tunnels at the bottoms of wells such as this one…Piazza Giordano Bruno; Perugia, Italy.

It has been said that there are passageways and tunnels at the bottoms of wells such as this one…

Piazza Giordano Bruno; Perugia, Italy.

(Source: nicolasbruno)

Cite Arrow reblogged from syxx
noiseman:

Salome by Jean Benner, 1899.


Coldalbion, if you ever need someone to ritually behead you I&#8217;d be honored to be your executioner at no extra cost. &lt;3

noiseman:

Salome by Jean Benner, 1899.

Coldalbion, if you ever need someone to ritually behead you I’d be honored to be your executioner at no extra cost. <3

Cite Arrow reblogged from coldalbion
The Mary-El Tarot, by Ms. Graveyard Dirt
I don’t know if this constitutes as a proper birthday gift, but Italics snagged a copy of Marie White’s long-awaited Mary-El Tarot when it was first released a few months back.
(I was, like, a total fangirl and left the swanked-the-fuck-out deck on our Eastern Orthodox-Pagan Easter altar for days.)

The Mary-El Tarot, by Ms. Graveyard Dirt

I don’t know if this constitutes as a proper birthday gift, but Italics snagged a copy of Marie White’s long-awaited Mary-El Tarot when it was first released a few months back.

(I was, like, a total fangirl and left the swanked-the-fuck-out deck on our Eastern Orthodox-Pagan Easter altar for days.)

Cite Arrow reblogged from graveyarddirt
"Fuck Me!" Garlic, by Ms. Graveyard Dirt
The Monday immediately following Easter is Easter Monday, a day reserved for games, socializing and courting by Orthodox Slavs.
One of the lesser known traditions involves the blessing of women through lighthearted prankish behavior to ensure health and beauty throughout the rest of the year - a custom no doubt originally conceived and practiced by pre-Christian ancestors. To show your gratitude for the well wishes it’s customary to thank your blesser with a pysanka (a ritually decorated egg), or a token sum of money.
Last year I presented Italics with a bright yellow egg emblazoned with “FUCK ME!” after one or two skin-welting rounds with his leather belt. Normally I offer an egg-themed gift rather than a real egg, so he was unsure of what to do with the perishable payment. I suggested planting something edible over it so we could later harvest and eat the pysanka-enriched “fruit” together in a special meal.
Garlic was my first recommendation (it’s one of my personal favorites for just about everything), and the idea was seconded before I had a chance to come up with another option. Last autumn I embedded a ritually-charged clove over the “FUCK ME!” pysanka, and for nearly a year I nurtured the garlic plant with homegrown comfrey leaves and libations of menstrual blood-infused water from every menses cycle experienced.
See also: Spanking Day, Ukrainian Easter Eggs: Krashanky &amp; Pysanky

"Fuck Me!" Garlic, by Ms. Graveyard Dirt

The Monday immediately following Easter is Easter Monday, a day reserved for games, socializing and courting by Orthodox Slavs.

One of the lesser known traditions involves the blessing of women through lighthearted prankish behavior to ensure health and beauty throughout the rest of the year - a custom no doubt originally conceived and practiced by pre-Christian ancestors. To show your gratitude for the well wishes it’s customary to thank your blesser with a pysanka (a ritually decorated egg), or a token sum of money.

Last year I presented Italics with a bright yellow egg emblazoned with “FUCK ME!” after one or two skin-welting rounds with his leather belt. Normally I offer an egg-themed gift rather than a real egg, so he was unsure of what to do with the perishable payment. I suggested planting something edible over it so we could later harvest and eat the pysanka-enriched “fruit” together in a special meal.

Garlic was my first recommendation (it’s one of my personal favorites for just about everything), and the idea was seconded before I had a chance to come up with another option. Last autumn I embedded a ritually-charged clove over the “FUCK ME!” pysanka, and for nearly a year I nurtured the garlic plant with homegrown comfrey leaves and libations of menstrual blood-infused water from every menses cycle experienced.

See also: Spanking Day, Ukrainian Easter Eggs: Krashanky & Pysanky

Cite Arrow reblogged from graveyarddirt
Spanking Day

In the Czech Republic and Slovakia, a tradition of spanking or whipping is carried out on Easter Monday. In the morning, men spank women with a special handmade whip called a pomlázka (in Czech) or korbáč (in Slovak), or, in eastern Moravia and Slovakia, throw cold water on them. The pomlázka/korbáč consists of eight, twelve or even twenty-four withies (willow rods), is usually from half a meter to two meters long and decorated with coloured ribbons at the end. The spanking is not painful or intended to cause suffering. A legend says that women should be spanked with a whip in order to keep their health and beauty during the whole next year.

An additional purpose can be for men to exhibit their attraction to women; unvisited women can even feel offended. Traditionally, the spanked woman gives a coloured egg and sometimes a small amount of money to the man as a sign of her thanks. In some regions, the women can get revenge in the afternoon or the following day when they can pour a bucket of cold water on any man. The habit slightly varies across Slovakia and the Czech Republic. A similar tradition existed in Poland (where it is called Dyngus Day), but it is now little more than an all-day water fight.

The first year we did this I put Italics’s gift egg in my pussy before he went down on me, and he ended up getting walloped in the forehead when the egg accidentally shot out at high velocity.

Cite Arrow reblogged from graveyarddirt
Hocktide & Hock-Days

Hocktide or Hock tide was an English mediaeval festival celebrated on the second Tuesday after Easter Sunday; it and the preceding Monday were the Hock-days. Together with Whitsuntide and the twelve days of Yuletide the week following Easter marked the only vacations of the husbandman’s year, during slack times in the cycle of the year when the villein ceased work on his lord’s demesne, and most likely on his own land as well. Early folk celebrations of Hocktide are undocumented, though as a term day, it appears often in documents. By the 19th century the festivities consisted of the men of the parish binding the women on the Monday and demanding a kiss for their release. On the Tuesday, the actual Hock-day, the women would tie up the men and demand a payment before setting them free. The monies collected would then be donated to the parish funds. The origins of the name Hocktide are unknown.

Hock-Tuesday was an important term day, rents being then payable, for with Michaelmas it divided the rural agricultural year into its seasons of winter (followed by Lent) and summer (followed by harvest). No trace of the word is found in Old English, and hock-day, its earliest use in composition, appears first in the 12th century. Hocktide and hock-money are first attested in 1484 (OED)

George C. Homans notices the parallel pattern as at Yuletide, of a solemn feast of the Church, that of Christmas itself, followed by a festive holiday, with the agricultural round beginning anew after Epiphany, with the folk customs of Plow Monday. Until the 19th century in England, Plow Monday, the first Monday after Epiphany, occasioned the antics of the gang of young plowmen, calling themselves the “plow-bullocks”, who went door to door with the caparisoned “white plow”, collecting pennies; when these were withheld they might plow up the dooryard.

At Coventry there was a play called The Old Coventry Play of Hock Tuesday. This, suppressed at the Reformation owing to the incidental disorder that accompanbied it, and revived as part of the festivities on Queen Elizabeth’s visit to Kenilworth in July 1575, depicted the struggle between Saxons and Danes, and has given colour to the suggestion[citation needed] that hock-tide was originally a commemoration of the massacre of the Danes on St Brice’s Day, November 13 AD 1002, or of the rejoicings at the death of Harthacanute on June 8, 1042 and the expulsion of the Danes. But the dates of these anniversaries do not bear this out.

Until the 16th century, Hocktide was widely celebrated in England on the second Tuesday after Easter, although the massacre of the Danes in 1002, by order of King Ethelred the Unready, took place around the feast of St Brice, on 13 November and Hardicanute’s death in 1042 occurred on the 8 June. The festivities were banned under Henry VIII as they were thought to encourage public disorder, but Elizabeth I was petitioned to reinstate the tradition in 1575, an event recorded in Sir Walter Scott’s Kenilworth. How popular the revival was is not recorded, but a number of towns are known to have re-established the tradition. However by the end of the 17th century the festival was largely forgotten.

Hocktide Today:

In England today, the tradition survives only in Hungerford in Berkshire, although the festival was somewhat modified to celebrate the patronage of the Duchy of Lancaster. John of Gaunt, the 1st Duke of Lancaster, granted grazing rights and permission to fish in the River Kennet to the commoners of Hungerford. Despite a legal battle during the reign of Elizabeth I when the Duchy attempted to regain the lucrative fishing rights, the case was eventually settled in the townspeople’s favour after the Queen herself interceded. Hocktide in Hungerford now combines the ceremonial collecting of the rents with something of the previous tradition of demanding kisses or money.

Although the Hocktide celebrations take place over several days, the main festivities occur on the Tuesday, which is known as Tutti Day. The Hocktide Council, which is elected on the previous Friday, appoints two Tutti Men whose job it is to visit the properties attracting Commoner’s Rights. Formerly they collected rents, and it was their job to accompany the Bellman (or Town crier) to summon commoners to attend the Hocktide Court in the Town Hall, and to fine those who were unable to attend one penny, in lieu of the loss of their rights. The Tutti Men carry Tutti Poles: wooden staffs topped with bunches of flowers and a cloved orange. These are thought to have derived from nosegays which would have mitigated the smell of some of the less salubrious parts of the town in times past. The Tutti Men are accompanied by the Orange Man (or Orange Scrambler), who wears a hat decorated with feathers and carries a white sack filled with oranges, and Tutti Wenches who give out oranges and sweets to the crowds in return for pennies or kisses.

The proceedings start at 8 am with the sounding of the horn from the Town Hall steps which summons all the commoners to the attend the Court at 9 am, after which the Tutti Men visit each of the 102 houses in turn. They no longer collect rents, but demand a penny or a kiss from the lady of the house when they visit. In return the Orange Man gives the owner an orange. After the parade of the Tutti Men through the streets the Hocktide Lunch is held for the Hocktide Council, commoners and guests, at which the traditional “Plantagenet Punch” is served. After the meal, an initiation ceremony, known as Shoeing the Colts is held, in which all first time attendees are shod by the blacksmith. Their legs are held and a nail is driven into their shoe. They are not released until they shout “Punch”. Oranges and heated coins are then thrown from the Town Hall steps to the children gathered outside.

Cite Arrow reblogged from graveyarddirt
allaboutmary:

The statue of the Sorrowful Mother in mourning dress in the hermitage of Our Lady of the Garden Enclosed in Warfhuizen, the Netherlands.

allaboutmary:

The statue of the Sorrowful Mother in mourning dress in the hermitage of Our Lady of the Garden Enclosed in Warfhuizen, the Netherlands.

(Source: mariabroederschap.nl)

Cite Arrow reblogged from sonofthecailleach
victoriousvocabulary:

NIXIE
[noun]
shapeshifting water spirits who usually appear in human form; a water sprite, often a foreboding one.
Variations: German - Nix, Nixie, Nyx. Norwegian - Nøkk, Nøkken (plural).
Etymology: from Middle High German nickese, Old High German nicchessa, related to Sanskrit nḗnēkti, Greek nízō (νίζω) and níptō (νίπτω), and Irish nigh’ - all meaning “to wash or be washed”.
[Annie Stegg]

victoriousvocabulary:

NIXIE

[noun]

shapeshifting water spirits who usually appear in human form; a water sprite, often a foreboding one.

Variations: German - Nix, Nixie, Nyx. Norwegian - Nøkk, Nøkken (plural).

Etymology: from Middle High German nickese, Old High German nicchessa, related to Sanskrit nḗnēkti, Greek nízō (νίζω) and níptō (νίπτω), and Irish nigh’ - all meaning “to wash or be washed”.

[Annie Stegg]

Cite Arrow reblogged from victoriousvocabulary

The Angel of the Darker Drink by Katrine Bingham / Cumbres Borrascosas (1847) - Emily Brontë

The Angel of the Darker Drink by Katrine Bingham / Cumbres Borrascosas (1847) - Emily Brontë

Cite Arrow reblogged from victoria-vacuus